Much ado about a faucet

I have mixed feelings about faucets. On one hand, it’s basically free Bitcoin (or Devcoin, or Litecoin…). On the other hand, it’s actually quite time consuming to keep up with them. For this reason although I know of many faucets I only keep up with a tiny handful of them.

I currently have four favorite faucets, but I only have to keep up with three of them. The QoinPro faucet is a passive one. My account gets credited each day no matter what. I don’t have to log in or even visit the site. But I do like to log in every once in a while just to see how the project is going. Today I learned that QoinPro has added InfiniteCoin to its daily dispenses.

My next favorite Bitcoin faucet is Free Bitcoin. This one usually pays out right around 225 sat every hour that I visit it. I hit it up several times a day. I think the part that keeps me coming back is that there is always a small chance that I could win a dispense as high as 0.225 BTC! To play the faucet lottery game, I enter a Captcha, then click on a roll button, and it gives me a random number and the dispense that goes with it. Most of the numbers yield the lowest dispense of 225 sat, which is still very generous for a faucet. If I roll exactly 10,000 I get 0.225 BTC. There are several other prizes in between, and once I won 2250 sat for rolling a luckier number.

Free Bitcoin is a faucet that you have to log into in order to play. About a week ago I learned why the optional field for email address is not really optional. I had to clear my browsing history. After I did that I tried to visit Free Bitcoin, only to find that I had to log in again. For some reason I did not have the password stored in my vault. I tried a couple of generic passwords I sometimes use but none of them worked.

The only password recovery option involved somehow signing a message using my Bitcoin-QT wallet client. I tried to figure that out and didn’t get anywhere. The field where I’d have to fill in the signature kept returning an error message that it was the incorrect signature. I still have no idea how that Bitcoin-QT feature is supposed to work, but evidently it is used in situations where someone needs to prove that he or she owns a specific Bitcoin address. In the case of Free Bitcoin, they needed some way to prove that my email address and my Bitcoin wallet address were both owned by me, a fact which would have been obvious had I completed the email field when I registered.

Fortunately a signed message is not the only way. I contacted the site admin through the website explaining my situation. I got a reply within hours instructing me to send a tiny amount of BTC to a certain address from the address associated with the account I wanted to recover. I sent the smallest amount possible, and they responded with an email containing a password reset link. The amount I’d sent minus the transaction fee (which in this case was considerably larger than the amount) was returned to my account along with my collection of dispenses during the normal weekly automatic payment.

The overall cost to recover my password (the transaction fee) amounted to somewhere between five and ten cents. But the annoying part about it was that I very seldom get that much in dispenses from this faucet in a week’s time. So essentially it took all my earnings from one week to recover access to my account.

And when I consider that I will earn somewhere between five and ten cents after a week of visiting the faucet I have to wonder why I bother. It’s not like I can’t earn thousands more by doing other things. I think my main reason for coming back to Free Bitcoin over and over is that it’s kind of fun. It’s also a nice little break from other things I’m doing on the computer. Finally, there’s the random aspect of it, including the fact that I have a one in ten thousand chance of winning a dispense that’s worth over a hundred dollars.

There’s a part of me that definitely is a gambler, and this may be why I have taken so well to the Bitcoin world. After all, many of the early Bitcoin sites as well as new ones that pop up all the time are gambling sites. I do not play games of chance that require I put money on the line. However, I am happy to take a few seconds out of my day to play a lottery style game where I could win big but that even if I don’t I will not lose anything but the seconds it took to play, and I’m guaranteed to win something every single time, even if it’s a miniscule amount. Free Bitcoin is a very good faucet for people like me.

And I have to give them a shout out for their excellent customer service.

While I’m on the subject I also want to mention a very similar faucet which dispenses small amounts of Litecoin. If you’re looking to slowly accumulate Litecoin, then LTC4you is a good faucet to hit up. Similar to Free Bitcoin, you can roll for a lucky number every hour with dispenses ranging from 2 uLTC up to 50 uLTC depending on which number you rolled.

The Devcoin faucet is also well worth visiting. It pays out five Devcoins several times a day. Since Devcoin transactions usually only cost one Devcoin, then one faucet dispense will pay for five transactions. Because of this faucet I basically get free Devcoin transactions for the foreseeable future.

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One Response to Much ado about a faucet

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